Category Archives: Action Campaigns

Each week we spread the word through social media and blogging about the amazing work our partners are doing for those in need. Please feel free to browse through our action campaigns to make a difference through a simple tweet, blog post, +1, or status update. Every little bit helps!

News: Social Good Moms is Now 3000 Members Strong

3000membersThe Mom Bloggers for Social Good community recently surpassed 3000 members!

We have always said that the greater our numbers the greater our impact! As the Social Good Moms community continues to grow the more good we can do collectively to spread the word about important issues like world and domestic hunger, maternal health and mortality, newborn health, HIV/AIDS and its opportunistic infections, malaria, water and sanitation and a whole host of global health and development issues.

Continue reading News: Social Good Moms is Now 3000 Members Strong

Three Avocados Creates Clean Water and Education Projects Through Coffee Sales

For over five years Three Avocados has funded global water and education projects in Uganda and Nicaragua through the sale of their coffee and branded products like tumblers, T-shirts, and coffee mugs.

Three Avocados Coffee

I recently received two bags of Three Avocados arabica ground coffee  – one from Nicaragua and the other from Uganda. Both are quite good.  I am a big fan of very strong, dark roast coffee and Three Avocados definitely does not disappoint.

When I opened my box of samples, the smell of coffee hit me before I even saw the coffee bags. I loved that Three Avacados Coffee - Projectsimmediately. In my experience if I can smell ground coffee before I even open the bag I know it will likely be very good.

Continue reading Three Avocados Creates Clean Water and Education Projects Through Coffee Sales

9 Last-Minute Virtual Valentine’s Day Gifts for Good

Valentine's Day 1

If you’re like many of us you may have waited until the very last-minute to buy your loved ones Valentine’s Day gifts. While you can still run out and buy a wealth of flowers, cards, and chocolates, here are nine virtual Valentines’s Day gifts you can give that also give back.

Oxfam Unwrapped: Oxfam recommends giving duos of animals for Valentine’s Day: a pair of chickens ($18), a pair of sheep ($80) or a pair of goats ($100).  Send lovely animals to families in need.

Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation: EGPAF is asking its lovely supporters to send Valentine’s Day e-cards to spread awareness about pediatric AIDS. It costs nothing, but the gift of awareness is always key. Click here to spread the love.

Midwives for Haiti: We all believe in the power of saving mothers’ lives. This Valentine’s Day donate to Midwives for Haiti and help them stock their medicinal chest with life-saving medicines for the entire year. Donate with love to Midwives for Haiti.

Vaccine Ambassadors: There is no doubt that vaccines save lives. Vaccines are one of the best ways to show love for children around the world. Buy vaccines with love for children whose lives can be saved by this easy intervention. $10 vaccinates 19 children against the measles.

Continue reading 9 Last-Minute Virtual Valentine’s Day Gifts for Good

Malaria No More Launches #MalariaSucks Campaign

As you might know last Friday marked World Malaria Day, a day to encourage the global health community, the private sector, governments, NGOs, and everyday, ordinary people to keep up the fight to help defeat malaria.

Every minute a child dies of malaria somewhere in the world, most of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa. In fact, 90% of children who die from malaria live in Africa and 40% of those live in Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, according to WorldMalariaDay.org. There is encouraging news, however. From 2000 – 2012 3.3 million lives were saved due to scaled up malaria control interventions. What many might not understand is that malaria is completely preventable and treatable, a fact that is repeatedly reiterated by the World Health Organization and others. Interventions such a insecticide-treated bed nets, residual indoor spraying, and draining of stagnant water helps to control malaria. One of the reasons many children, especially those under the age of five, die from malaria is because they are not treated in time or remote areas do not have access to rapid diagnostic tests and treatments.

Chongwe District Hospital
A mother and son in Chongwe District Hospital outside of Lusaka, Zambia. He was recovering from a severe bought of malaria. Copyright: Jennifer James

Malaria No More, an international NGO that is determined to end malaria, launched its Malaria Sucks campaign on World Malaria Day that encourages donations, as low as $1, to help save more children from dying from malaria. Malaria Sucks’ icon is an orange lollipop that signifies what children in malaria prone areas miss out on – their childhoods. One donated dollar goes to rapid diagnostic testing and full treatment for one child, so a dollar indeed makes a difference.

Celebrities have taken on the issue like Anthony Bourdain and James Ven Der Beek who tweeted their support of the Malaria Sucks campaign.

“MalariaSUCKS is a fun, tangible way for supporters to connect to an issue that may seem distant from their everyday lives,” said Malaria No More CEO Martin Edlund in a statement. “We’re putting our supporters in the spotlight – asking them to help us create real change through an everyday activity like posting a selfie and spreading a powerful humanitarian message through their social networks. It’s our pink ribbon, only sweeter.”

Global social engagement is key to the success of the campaign and Malaria No More is making it fun. Anyone can join the conversation by donating money to www.MalariaNoMore.org/MalariaSUCKS and by posting to #MalariaSucks.

#MalariaSucks http://malarianomore.org/malariasucks

A photo posted by A. Yancey (@fancyayancey) on

You can also generate a lollipop selfie and share with your friends. Here’s mine.

6d03039f-3e27-468c-8c94-d7ce3a64cc4e-comp-suck

Visit www.MalariaNoMore.org/MalariaSUCKS to save a life.

Full disclosure: I traveled to Zambia with Malaria No More in October 2013 to cover the global launch of its Power of One campaign.

Global Impact Launches Innovative Fund to Help Women and Girls

We are proud to support Global Impact with the launch of its Women & Girls Fund this week during International Women’s Day. Below, read more about how you can join Global Impact, CARE, World Vision, Plan USA and ICRW to help women and girls around the world. And be sure to join our conversation on Twitter this Friday, March 7 at 2 PM EST. RSVP at twtvite.com/womensdaychat.

This week marks a momentous occasion to celebrate women and girls and to continue to work tirelessly to make their lives better around the world. Saturday, March 8, is the annual International Women’s Day celebration where the world comes together to raise awareness about the global plight of women and girls.

plan3
Photo courtesy of PLAN

• Did you know that an estimated sixty percent of women have been physically or sexually abused?

• Did you know that women produce half of the world’s food, but own less than one percent of the world’s property?

• Did you know that each year, about 300,000 women suffer a preventable death during pregnancy and childbirth?

• Did you know that two-thirds of the children denied primary education are girls?

• Did you know women and girls make up ninety-eight percent of trafficking victims?

What Can We Really Do To Solve These Problems?

Global Impact, a world leader in international philanthropy, has partnered with four of the best-in-the- business charities, CARE, World Vision, Plan, and the International Center for Research on Women, to raise awareness about these issues and to raise funds to help women and girls gain safer, healthier, more prosperous lives. Global Impact has brought these leading organizations together under one fund so that people passionate about helping women and girls can help the work of all four charities by giving in one place.

Photo Courtesy of CARE
Photo Courtesy of CARE

The Fund is one of the most effective ways to support programs that help women and girls. Through this fund, you will join a movement with millions of people to change the world by helping to provide education, protection and rehabilitation from violence and exploitation, job training, healthcare, safe drinking water and a host of other services to women and girls around the world.

Your contributions go directly to supporting real and meaningful work to improve the lives of women and girls. By investing in a girl, she can lift herself out of poverty and abuse, altering the condition of her family, her community and, ultimately, the world.

Visit www.togetherforwomen.org to donate any amount to help women and girls and to learn more about the Global Impact Women & Girls Fund.

No Birth Should be Left Up to Chance

Kenya: Carolyn MilesBy Carolyn Miles, President and CEO, Save the Children
Follow Carolyn Miles at @carolynsave.

Giving birth ranks among the scariest moments for any mother. It certainly was for me. I was living in Hong Kong at the time when my second child was born. And he was born in a hurry. He came so fast that I actually thought I’d give birth in our car on the way to the hospital! Fortunately, that didn’t happen and I safely delivered my son Patrick surrounded by a team of well-trained doctors and nurses, not to mention my loving (and relieved!) husband by my side.

But I’m one of the lucky ones.

As new research released today by Save the Children reveals, 40 million women give birth without any trained help whatsoever. What’s more, two million women give birth entirely alone.

I met one of those women in Nepal about five years ago. I was there visiting our programs in the south of the country and stopped in to see a mom who had given birth a month prior. She sat with us and talked quite matter-of-factly about how when she went into labor with her third child, she didn’t panic. She merely laid down in a clean part of her house, caught the baby when she came out, cut the umbilical cord and wrapped her to keep her warm.

When she had finished telling her story, and I had stopped shaking my head in amazement, I couldn’t help but compare her experience to mine. After all, both of our children came into the world faster than we had anticipated. However, while my husband was there to drive me—fast—to a first-class hospital, this woman had no one. Her husband was away in India on business and her two daughters were in the next village. Even if she could manage to get herself to the nearest clinic, which was 2 kilometers away, she would have had to travel on foot. So she did the next best thing; she left it up to chance.

Fortunately for this mom both she and her newborn survived. But for too many women in the same situation, the outcome is much more tragic.

So many things can go wrong when a mother gives birth without a skilled birth attendant (SBA). Things such as prolonged labor, pre-eclampsia and infection—which are perfectly manageable when an SBA is present—can mean a death sentence in the absence of one.

For this reason, Save the Children is calling on world leaders, philanthropists and the private sector to commit to ensuring that by 2025 every birth is attended by trained and equipped health workers who can deliver essential health interventions for both the mother and the newborn.

Because no birth should be left up to chance.

Read the report at www.savethechildren.org/newborns.

Photo above: A Community Health Doctor delivers vaccines to a mother and her newborn babies in Mongoloia. (United Nations)

Save the Children Releases New Report on Newborn Health

Did you know that in 2012 2.9 million newborns around the world did not live past 28 days and 1 million of those died within the first 24 hours of life? Additionally, 1.2 million babies died of stillbirth in 2012. These numbers are reported in Save the Children’s latest report released today: Ending Newborn Deaths: Ensuring Every Baby Survives. And the vast majority of those newborn deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. For example, the Democratic Republic of Congo recorded 41,800 newborn deaths on the day they were born. And Nigeria recorded 94,500 newborn deaths within the first 24 hours. These large numbers are, of course, attributable to the population of the countries, but the numbers are still too high, especially given that these numbers are four to five times higher than developed nations.

savetheChildren - chart1

2014, as I have written before, is the year of the newborn! Global NGOs, governments, and the private sector are all uniting to create a robust roadmap to put an end to the millions of newborns that die every year from health complications that are easily preventable and a lack of resources. Save the Children’s Ending Newborn Deaths report is one important piece of this critical roadmap.

globalteamof2007_copyToday 24 members of the Global Team of 200, a highly specialized group of members of Mom Bloggers for Social Good that concentrates on issues involving women and girls, children, world hunger and maternal health, will post for 24 hours about the importance of newborn health and about Ending Newborn Deaths. We are posting for 24 hours in honor of every newborn who will not make it past their first day of life today.

How to Help!

We can all do something to save newborn lives! Follow all of the posts on Tumblr and on Pinterest for the next 24 hours to learn more about this global movement to save more babies and about Save the Children’s report. You can join the conversation at #FirstDay. You can also comment on the Every Newborn Action Plan until Friday, February 28, to share your ideas about saving more newborns. And, finally, you can simply give to Save the Children to purchase newborn health kits for women in need who lack access to quality health workers and care.

FIRSTDAY_INFOGRAPHIC2

Becoming a Part of 2014’s One Billion Rising

1BRFJ-HorizontalLogo

One in three women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime. Let’s take that in for a moment. It’s such a silent epidemic. I know. I have seen women’s eyes in the countries I visit and even here at home. They can’t hide it. According to OneBillionRising.org, that number comes to one billion women worldwide. That number is wholly unacceptable and needs to be recognized, acknowledged and changed!

In 2014, on February 14 women and men (and MEN) around the world will stand up against violence against women. Although the official 1 Billion Rising for Justice celebration is a few months away still, we fully know how fast two months rolls around so we want to get the information out there to you now so you can plan accordingly.

You can sign up to be a part of 1 Billion Rising at www.onebillionrising.org. We hope you check it out. We will be a part of the festivities in February and we will be gearing up for it until then.

No woman deserves to be abused in any way. Stand up and take action!

It’s Time for the REAL Awards Again

When I was in Zambia two months ago I met a phenomenal nurse, Susan Banda, who treats women who have cervical cancer in the N’Gombe compound in Lusaka. She diagnoses and treats twenty-five women a day and says that she is increasingly seeing more cases of cervical cancer, especially in women who are HIV positive.

Her work is so selfless I made a video about Banda and her work helping so many women.

Because there are so many amazing health workers around the world Save the Children and the Frontline Health Workers Coalition launched The REAL Awards last year, an award that celebrates the selfless work of health workers who span the globe.

Nine months ago members of our Global Team of 200 spread the word about the first ever REAL Awards. Now, we are happy to spread the word again about the REAL awards’ second year where  health workers both here and abroad will be celebrated, acknowledged and awarded for their tireless work to help others.

Today marks the nomination period for the REAL Awards. You can nominate the following types of health workers:

  • nurses
  • doctors
  • midwives
  • pharmacists
  • nurse practitioners
  • hospice care workers
  • physician assistants
  • community health workers
  • public health officers
  • and general health practitioners.

If you know a deserving health worker nominate him or her at therealwards.com by October 25, 2013. Good luck to them!

Why Child Passenger Safety Week Should Be on Your Calendar

As soon as our little ones are born car seats are constant fixtures in our lives. We put them in our cars, take them out, reposition them and even buy brand-new ones all the time.  With all of that, have you ever thought about whether or not your child’s car seat is properly installed in your vehicle? You might be surprised to know that many car seats are installed improperly.

Most people don’t know that car crashes are a leading killer of children between the ages of 1 – 13. Many lives can be saved if children are seated in car seats that are properly fitted for your car. From 1975-2011, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that nearly 10,000 children age 4 and younger have been saved because of child restraints.

A properly fitted car seat can save a child’s life.

Starting today NHTSA is raising awareness about the right car seat for your child and proper installation of it in your car during Child Passenger Safety Week. This Saturday, September 21, you can visit a Child Car Seat Inspection Station to get your child’s car seat checked for free.

Car seat installation isn’t as easy as you might think. You have to take into consideration the type of vehicle you have, the brand of car seat you own as well as how it will be installed. Even before getting your car seat inspected you can read about the proper way to install it.

NHTSA has created a Parent Control Center where you can find all of the information you will need about proper car seat installation and car seat safety. Be sure to bookmark safercar.gov/therightseat.

Additionally, be sure to schedule time in your calendar on Saturday, September 21, 2013 to get your child’s car seat inspected. You can easily find a local station using this web app. Doing this can help save your child’s life!

NHTSA