Tag Archives: Health

Infographic of the Week: An Integrated Approach to HIV/AIDS and Family Planning Services

An integrated approach to healthcare no matter the setting is a more effective and rights-based approach to healthier outcomes. When family planning services are available at HIV/AIDS clinics, Population Action International (PAI) believes patients will receive better care, health workers will be more efficient, and dollars will be saved.

In sub-Saharan Africa integrated clinic settings are critical to healthier outcomes. In addition to this infographic, PAI created this film last year, In One Place, to drive home the importance of integrated services to family planning and HIV/AIDS services.

PAI Infographic

Announcing New Partner: PSI

We are really thrilled to announce our newest partner: PSI!

PSI is a global health organization dedicated to improving the health of people in the developing world by focusing on serious challenges like a lack of family planning, HIV and AIDS, barriers to maternal health, and the greatest threats to children under five, including malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia and malnutrition.

In fact, while I was in Zambia this month I saw many clinics in the country where PSI has a presence including a male circumcision clinic in Livingston.

A hallmark of PSI is a commitment to the principle that health services and products are most effective when they are accompanied by robust communications and distribution efforts that help ensure wide acceptance and proper use.

We look forward to working with PSI to spread the word about their great work around the world.

Connect with PSI:

Like them on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. And stay informed by reading our Impact blog.

Want to learn more? Send them an email: jkalungara-at psi-dot-org

[Photos] Celebrating World Health Workers Week

This week from April  8 – 12, 2013 the World Health Organization is celebrating World Health Workers Week. This is a week to honor those who are literally on the frontlines of health care in the developing world every single day. They are the ones who make sure mothers’ babies are attended to directly after birth. They are the ones who provide family planning services to women in the community who need them. They are the ones who educate their communities about healthy pregnancies and deliveries. They are the ones who help treat children for malaria and diarrhea and diagnose malnutrition. They are the ones who refer those who are ill  to hospitals when  their health is beyond what they can manage.

These are frontline health workers in Ethiopia. This week we honor them and frontline health workers all over the world and celebrate the lifesaving work they do every day.

SONY DSC SONY DSC SONY DSC Frontline Health Workers

Give to Maternal Health Programs in Uganda

Our partner, Shanti Uganda, is helping women experience safe deliveries in a country where 310 women out of 100,000 live births die during childbirth.

Now that a new year has rolled around Shanti Uganda has embarked on new opportunities to give and help women have healthy babies and safe, clean births. You can donate to provide more solar power for their birth house, purchase an acre of land to expand their services, provide birth supplies and transport, as well as contribute to their Vancouver office.

Read more about how to donate and support Shanti Uganda.

The White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood

White Ribbon Alliance for Safe MotherhoodThe White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood is an international coalition working to stop deaths during childbirth. They work in a number of countries including Uganda where they are looking to improve the national statistic of 1 in 49 chance of women dying during childbirth.

You can provide monthly or single donations to help keep women alive giving birth.

Life for Mothers

Life for MothersLife for Mothers seeks to identify, address, and prevent complications that arise during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and postpartum, ultimately decreasing maternal and infant mortality rates, according to the Life for Mothers web site.

The mission of Life for Mothers is to reduce maternal and infant mortality rates in developing countries, particularly those in Sub-Saharan Africa, by strengthening healthcare systems and developing, implementing, managing and funding integrated packages of essential services for maternal, newborn and child health at the district level.

You can donate via their Get Involved page.

Vote to Honor US Health Workers

traSave the Children along with Frontline Health Workers Coalition has created the REAL Awards where deserving United States-based health workers will be honored for the sacrifice and commitment they exhibit through their work. The nominations are in and the voting period has started. In fact, voting ends on January 7, 2013.

The Real Awards will honor and celebrate health workers in the following categories:

Winners will be announced on January 15 after voting ends on the January 7. You can vote once per day until the 7th.

Cast your vote at www.therealawards.com/vote for deserving health workers.

Photo: The REAL Awards

Do You Know an Amazing Health Worker?

Health workers are typically the unsung heroes around the world. They help women deliver their babies in health facilities, they treat babies who are too weak to thrive and even care for wounded civilians during time of war. Health workers assess our problems and patch us up the best they know how. And in developing countries where health workers are vital to the survival of communities their work is even more critical.

Save the Children along with Frontline Health Workers Coalition have created the REAL Awards where deserving United States-based health workers will be honored for the sacrifice and commitment they exhibit through their work.

If there is a doctor or nurse who inspires you be sure to nominate them for the REAL Awards. The deadline is today, November 29 – not too late to show someone you appreciate that you care.

Read more at www.therealawards.com/nominate.

Photo: Save the Children

10 Global Development Stories to be Thankful For

Typically when we think of global development we focus on everything that is wrong because the challenges are so great. Rarely are the successes celebrated because with every move towards a goal there is still so much to do.

Today we are featuring those stories that have been more about success than failure; more about moving forward than moving backward even if the net result only makes a small dent in the overall scheme of things.

    1. Female Genital Mutilation Banned Under New Somalian Constitution
    2. Path’s Sure Start Program Ensures the Reduction of Maternal Mortality
    3. Living, Thriving with HIV/AIDS: A Mother’s Story
    4. A Return to Normalcy: Mogadishu’s Lido Beach Lively Again
    5. Somalia’s Concerted Move Toward Gender Equality
    6. Men March Against Child Marriage in Liberia
    7. A Promising Trend for Data,Transparency
    8. New Fishing, Agricultural Development Project in Haiti
    9. Quick Impact Project Provides Education for Darfur Children
    10. Powering the Country With Wind Energy

What global development stories are you thankful for?

Photo: Jennifer James, Kenya

World Pneumonia Day – Why and How to Help

Today is World Pneumonia Day. Why? Pneumonia is the leading killer of children under five. 1.3 million people dies of pneumonia last year and 1 in 8 children were a part of those mortality figures according to worldpneumoniaday.org.

Pneumonia is an infectious, bacterial disease that adversely affects one’s lungs.

How can pneumonia be prevented?

  • Vaccines against pneumococcus, Hib, pertussis, and measles can prevent a significant portion of pneumonia cases from ever occurring.5
  • Other preventative strategies include: zinc supplementation for children with diarrhea, prevention of HIV infection in children & antibiotic prophylaxis for HIV-infected children.5

Also, mothers can protect their children against pneumonia through exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of their baby’s life. Regular handwashing cuts down germs and pathogens. Additionally, using clean cookstoves helps to reduces the risk of pneumonia.

“Pneumonia can be prevented and cured. Yet, for too long it has been the leading cause of global deaths among children. We know what to do, and we have made great progress – but we must do more. We must scale-up proven solutions and ensure they reach every child in need,” said United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

How Can You Help?

Visit worldpneumoniaday.org.

The 1:Face Watch Supports Global Causes

I love products with a purpose! There are many out there to choose from Toms, to Panda sunglasses to fair trade bracelets. Now, there is a new watch on the block that will launch on Monday on IndieGoGo called the 1: Face watch. Each watch color corresponds to a different cause. Pink supports breast cancer, red is for HIV/AIDS, white is for hunger, yellow is for water, blue is for the environment and black is for cancer.

Supporting Charity Water, Keep a Child Alive, the American Cancer Society, One Day’s Wages, and the Adventure Project, with every watch sold a donation will be made to the cause you support.

You can watch the 1: Face trailer below:

Official launch date is October 1 2012. Sign up to be notified when they’re live. www.1facewatch.com

Help Free Sierra Leone from Its Elephantiasis Epidemic

When living in tropical and subtropical regions of the world people are susceptible to all manner of diseases from malaria to hookworm. One of the seven most common neglected tropical diseases is elephantiasis, or lymphatic filariasis. To the lay person it is simply called “big foot”.

Elephantiasis is caused by female mosquitos biting on its victims and releasing larvae into one’s skin. Those larvae grow to become millions of micro threadlike worms and invade the lymphatic system of those who have been infected. The worms can live in humans for up to six years. Hard, bulbous, inflamed skin grows in the lower extremities including feet, legs, and genitals.

Can Elephantiasis Be Treated?

While there is no cure to elephantiasis it can be treated and prevented. A single dose of ivermectin and albendazole can treat elephantiasis.

In fact, you can give as little as $12 to our partner End 7 through Global Giving to protect 100 working adults from getting infected with lymphatic filariasis and five other neglected tropical diseases or give $30 to treat 250 children infected with lymphatic filariasis. $12 is all it takes to change a person’s life.

Photo Via our Partner End 7’s Facebook page.