Tag Archives: poverty

New homes recreate shattered lives in the Philippines

This post was originally published on the World Vision USA blog.

At everyone’s most basic level, we all want somewhere to lay our head every night. Filipinos living in the path of last year’s Typhoon Haiyan’s early morning storm surge and over 300km/hour winds lost everything within a 30-minute span, including their homes, and many, sadly, lost loved ones.

Those tracking the storm before it hit on November 8, 2013 projected that Typhoon Haiyan would reach the islands by 9 AM, but it sped up and reached landfall around 5 AM, just as everyone was sleeping. No one knew Haiyan would be as powerful as it was.

New homes recreate shattered lives | World Vision Blog
Photo: Jeana Shandraw/SurfandSunshine.com

After the storm, entire families were relegated to living in tents until temporary shelter kits could be delivered. Some live in makeshift and patchwork homes built from scraps even today, and some still do not have homes to call their own a year after Haiyan. And yet, there are some families who have been given the keys to a new home, one that was creatively designed to withstand high winds, rain, and – yes – even typhoons.

Continue reading New homes recreate shattered lives in the Philippines

The Face of Neglected Tropical Disease

When we think about diseases in Africa we think about the biggest of them – malaria, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and pneumonia. We forget about the neglected tropical diseases that debilitate so many in sub-Saharan Africa and southeast Asia from intestinal worms to elephantiasis. These diseases are real and they are easily prevented, but as their name suggests, these diseases are nearly neglected. In fact, the WHO Regional Director for Africa, Dr Luis G Sambo, called for increased funding last month to eradicate and control neglected tropical diseases by 2020 in Africa.

There has been notable progress is controlling neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). For example, all sub-Saharan countries save for Chad, Mali, Sudan and Ethiopia, have eradicated guinea worm. However there is still much work to do in order to wipe out the seven most common neglected tropical diseases.

The international NGO, End 7, is committed to seeing an end to neglected tropical diseases by 2020, but they need the help of the global public. A mere $.50 can protect one person for a full year from the seven most common NTDs. End7 has put together this telling video that shows the real face of neglected tropical disease. A young girl hasn’t grown properly and is perpetually legargic because of intestinal worms and her grandmother can no longer work because of elephantiasis.

Neglected tropical diseases keep the world’s poorest people in a constant cycle of poverty. These diseases – caused mainly by insects and parasites – keep productivity low. Sometimes entire communities are stricken by one or more of these diseases because they do not understand measure by which these diseases can be prevented and/or do not have the proper medications to keep these diseases at bay.

Visit End7.org to learn more and to take action.

A Compelling Case for a Justice Development Goal

Last Friday we participated in the UN Foundation’s digital rally toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We helped mark the 1000-day countdown to the MDGs and now that they are squarely in sight, there is much to do to ensure the goals are achieved. In reality, some won’t be met by the 2015 deadline and that is why global leaders have already met to develop a framework for post-2015 development goals.

The Open Society Foundations (OSF)has created a video citing the case for justice to be put on the post-2015 development agenda saying that without justice no other goal can effectively be reached. Their argument makes sense.

OSF’s case is that justice is the foundation upon which all goals can be achieved.

“About four billion people live without rights and without access to the protections of the law, vulnerable to exploitation and violence, at risk of losing their homes or their land, and at a disadvantage in dealing with the criminal and civil justice systems that should be there to protect them,” wrote Christopher Stone, President of Open Society Foundations.

Watch the phenomenal video below about adding justice to the global agenda. And download Open Society Foundation’s Successful Models for Partnerships and Implementation.

HBO Presents New Documentary About Poverty – ‘American Winter’

UPDATE: Did you watch American Winter and want to help? Visit their Facebook page for updates. You can also donate to their Kickstarter campaign to help the families profiled in the documentary.

Tonight at 9 PM on HBO a riveting new documentary, American Winter, will premiere to millions of people. The award-winning documentary shows the injustices of American families in Oregon as they brave poverty and winter.

American Winter

THE FILM: Directed by Emmy-winning filmmakers Joe and Harry Gantz (HBO’s “Taxicab Confessions,” “The Defenders”), AMERICAN WINTER features struggling Oregon families who called into the state’s “211info” social services hotline in search of help in the winter of AmericanWinter_KEYART_2012. The film presents an intimate snapshot of the state of the nation’s economy as it is playing out in the lives of many American families, and reveals the human consequences of rising economic insecurity, budget cuts to the social safety net, and the fracturing of the American Dream.

WHEN: Debuting MONDAY, MARCH 18 (9:00-10:30 p.m. ET/PT), exclusively on HBO.

WHY: The latest U.S. census data shows that 48.5 million Americans are living in poverty, the largest number in the 53-year history of published poverty estimates. This includes 16.1 million children.

American Winter

Watch the Trailer

Our Newest Partner: No Kid Hungry

We are happy to announce that our newest partner is Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry® campaign. Throughout the year we, along with our the Social Good Moms and Global Team of 200 network of moms, will advocate to ensure all children get healthy food every day.

The No Kid Hungry campaign connects kids in need to effective nutrition programs like school breakfast and summer meals and teaches low-income families to cook healthy, affordable meals through Cooking Matters. This work is accomplished through the No Kid Hungry network, made up of private citizens, public officials, nonprofits, business leaders and others providing innovative hunger solutions in their communities. Join them at NoKidHungry.org.

Last week we were thrilled to partner with NoKidHungry.com to spread awareness about National School Breakfast Week. You can read the wonderful posts by Social Good Moms and member of the Global Team of 200 here.

Save the Children Releases Report on Post-2015 Framework for Ending Poverty

Ending Poverty in Our GenerationAs we all know the Millennium Development Goals are set to expire in 2015. While much progress has been made globally over the past twenty years to eradicate poverty and to meet each of the individual goals there is still much to do. With the MDGs on their way out, Save the Children has devised a framework for post-2015 work to end global poverty and spur human development.

Save the Children’s Chief Executive Justin Forsyth said:

“An historic achievement is within reach. By committing to these ambitious but achievable new targets, we really can become the generation that ends extreme poverty forever.

“For the first time, it is feasible to imagine that in the next two decades no child will die from preventable causes, no child will go to bed hungry and every child will go to school.”

In Ending Poverty In Our Generation,  Save the Children says global poverty can end in 20 years through new goals it lays out for post-2015 global development action. Save the Children notes that the following goals are not meant to be definitive. Rather, they are a starting place to continue the poverty eradication conversation. A high level panel, including Prime Minister David Cameron, Liberian president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and Indonesia’s President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono will meet in Monrovia, Liberia between 29th January and 1st February 2013 to discuss the direction of post-2015 global development.

Goal 1: By 2030 we will eradicate extreme poverty and reduce relative poverty through
inclusive growth and decent work

Goal 2: By 2030 we will eradicate hunger, halve stunting, and ensure universal access to
sustainable food, water and sanitation

Goal 3: By 2030 we will end preventable child and maternal mortality and provide
healthcare for all

Goal 4: By 2030 we will ensure all children receive a good-quality education and have
good learning outcomes

Goal 5: By 2030 we will ensure all children live a life free from all forms of violence,
are protected in conflict and thrive in a safe family environment

Goal 6: By 2030 governance will be more open, accountable and inclusive

Goal 7: By 2030 we will have robust global partnerships for more and effective use of
financial resources

Goal 8: By 2030 we will build disaster-resilient societies

Goal 9: By 2030 we will have a sustainable, healthy and resilient environment for all

Goal 10: By 2030 we will deliver sustainable energy to all

UNICEF, one of Save the Children’s key partners, said they welcome the new goals and framework set forth in the report saying:

“UNICEF looks forward to continuing to work closely with Save the Children and other key partners for children’s rights, as the debate intensifies on how best to safeguard, extend and sustain human progress in the post-2015 international framework.”

Download Ending Poverty in Our Generation: Save the Children’s Vision for a Post-2015 Framework.

Photo: Children in Hawassa, Ethiopia. Copyright: Jennifer James

The Guardian Looks at Key Millennium Development Goals Datasets

If you follow the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) you know there are a variety of global datasets that sometimes are in concert with one another and other times contradict one another. It is important to know the critical datasets to zero in on in order to analyze the progress of the MDGs.

The Guardian published Millennium development goals – the key datasets you need to know today that will help development experts, the media, and those interested in the progress of poverty eradication and its effects.

If you’re interested in following the key data be sure to check out the article above. Also, they have provided data that you can mash up and share as well.

Photo Above:

Meningitis Vaccination Campaign Takes Off in Darfur

A child receives a meningitis vaccination at the Al Neem Camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in El Daein, East Darfur, Sudan.

A major vaccination campaign against meningitis A, organized by the Government of Sudan and the World Health Organization (WHO), debuted earlier this month and targets 16.9 million children and adults across Darfur. The vaccine protects young adults and children as young as one, conferring immunity that could last a decade. WHO estimates that their efforts could reduce cases of meningitis A between 80 and 85% and save nearly 150,000 young lives by 2015.

UN Photo/Albert González Farran

[Act] Support Everyone’s Basic Right to Adequate Shelter

 

If you have been to developing countries or have seen poverty housing in any developed nation  you know there are billions of people around the world who desperately need adequate housing. The first Monday of every October has been designated by the United Nations as World Habitat Day. It serves as a reminder to all of us that everyone deserves adequate shelter.

This year’s theme is Changing Cities, Building Opportunities because when cities prosper so do its residents.

Action: Habitat for Humanity is urging everyone to pledge their support for adequate shelter for all. You can sign Habitat’s Pledge to End Poverty Housing to call on key decision makers to:

  • Recognize the role of housing in communities
  • Make affordable, adequate housing a priority
  • Change the systems and policies that lead to poverty housing
Neighborhood of Habitat houses at South Lunzu | Blantyre, Malawi

 

Heifer International Teaches Children About Giving

Heifer International, the organization we affectionately know to empower families the world over through animal gifts that provide not only a way out of hunger, but also a way into sustainable self-reliance, just launched a new interactive educational tool teaching children the power of giving. Aimed squarely at children between the ages of 5-10, Heifer’s new character, Sarah the Goat, guides children through the process of what it means to give an animal gift to a family living in poverty.

Children even as young as five will be able to grasp the concept of how one animal -from a goat, to a chicken, to a llama – can immeasurably changed the trajectory of a family with little to eat and hardly a way to earn income. As parents it is important to introduce our children to philanthropy at an early age. Heifer International helps us do that by creating an easy-to-understand tool allowing kids to understand that small changes can result in sustainable difference.

Using Heifer’s educational tool, children are mentioned in writing by name (parents have to put it in to get started) to kick off the personalized lesson and then Sarah the Goat begins to ask  questions that  allows kids to think critically about the importance of an animal to families in the developing world. While the issues of poverty and hunger are huge concepts for children to fully understand Sarah the Goat brings those huge issues to a kid’s level without missing the greater point of doing something for others.

To use the educational tool with your child visit  www.heifer.org/alt-gift/sarah

Helping Those in Need of Food Assistance

The World Food Programme is the largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger on the planet. They do amazing things every day in every corner of the world that needs the greatest help.

The World Food Programme recently released their 2011 Year in Review. It is well worth a read if you have a chance. According to the report the World Food Programme’s 2011 food assistance reached nearly 100 million people in 75 countries around the world. The vast majority — nearly 83 million — were women and children. They also provided 3.6 million metric tons of food assistance to people in need.

It was also wonderful to read that in 2011 the World Food Programme raised $11.9 million from their online audience. In fact, you can give to the World Food Programme online now. The WFP is entirely funded by volunteer donations.

Hunger Crisis in the Sahel

UN Photo/Eric Kanalstein