Tag Archives: women

41 Maternal Health Organizations to Follow and Support #IntlMHDay

Today is the 2nd annual International Day of Maternal Health and Rights which calls attention to and demands action for the right of every woman to respectful maternity care no matter where she lives in the world. This is critical because a woman dies in childbirth every two minutes totalling nearly 300,000 maternal deaths each year. Ninety-nine percent of these deaths are wholly preventable.

Many pregnant women are also subject to excessive, disrespectful care including verbal and physical abuse during pregnancy and childbirth as well as denial of care and demands for payment before care.  As these scenarios continue more awareness needs to be made about quality, respectful care for every pregnant woman. It’s their right!

In honor of International Day of Maternal Health and Rights we put together a list of 41 maternal health organizations and organizations that work on other global health efforts of which maternal health is one. Please support and follow them. If we missed your organization, please email us at info@mombloggersforsocialgood.com with your Twitter handle. We plan to make an additional list in the coming weeks.

1. aroadlesstravelled @ARLTafric: Working with nomadic pastoralist communities in Ethiopia & Kenya to improve maternal & child health.

2. ARROW ‏@ARROW_Women: Championing Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights #SRHR #SRHR4all

3. CAN-MNCH @CAN_MNCH: Over 80 organizations working to improve the lives of women, babies and children in over 1,000 regions around the world. Team Canada!

4. CARE(care.org) @CARE: CARE fights global poverty by empowering girls and women. Visit http://CARE.org and join us.

5. CHANGE ‏@genderhealth: The Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE) works to advance the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls worldwide.

Continue reading 41 Maternal Health Organizations to Follow and Support #IntlMHDay

UNESCO Report Shows Sobering Global Education Progress

Fifteen years ago an educational framework was set in Dakar, Senegal at the World Education Forum that established goals to achieve “Education for All” by 2015. Since then, the number of children who are now out of school has fallen by half, but there are still 58 million children out of school globally and around 100 million children who do not complete primary education according to the report.

Of course, it is the world’s poorest children who are largely not attending school. In fact, poor children globally are four times less likely to attend school than the world’s richest children. And since the World Education Forum in 2000, only one third of countries have achieved all of the measurable Education for All (EFA) goals.

There has been some progress since 2000, however. 184 million children were enrolled in pre-primary education worldwide, an increase of nearly two-thirds since 1999. And yet, for older children, especially those who live in sub-Saharan Africa, 20 percent of enrolled children drop out before graduating.

Continue reading UNESCO Report Shows Sobering Global Education Progress

Video Member Feature: Samantha Sophia

For the next few weeks we will feature videos of Social Good Moms and members of our Global Team of 200 sharing why they love being a part of our community of moms.

The first mom that we’re featuring is Samantha Sophia. Follow her at @raisingself.

“I’m a mother, I’m a wife, I’m a corporate professional, I’m a blogger and I am a Global Team of 200 member. In my little Southern California neighborhood, you couldn’t imagine that there were any people in the world suffering from extreme poverty or inequality. I drive through manicured communities, sit in a modern office overlooking perfect skylines, and Instagram the abstract beauty of the hipster farm to table restaurant I went to with a gal pal for lunch. To see me now, you couldn’t imagine that just one generation ago, not a member of my family had ever gone to university. You can’t see that my seeming success is propped up by generations of women with no access to something as basic as an education.

I’m a Global Team of 200 member because I care about my global community, because I have a deep desire not to turn away from but face reality head on and be a part of a conduit for social change. I am a Global Team of 200 member because I believe our collective voices have power enough to move the mountains of adversity and struggle faced by our brothers and sisters across the world.”

How Four Organizations Use Storytelling and Data to Highlight Women’s Health and Global Progress

Over the past few days several organizations have focused on International Women’s Day by releasing reports on the progress of women and girls in a variety of sectors through interactive web sites, data, as well as maps. The following have stood out during the week.

Doctors Without Borders

Women’s health care is critical in many low- and middle-income countries largely because women as well as girls continue to die in numbers that are not only too high, but oftentimes unnecessary. For example, 800 women still die from complications during pregnancy and childbirth. The vast majority of these deaths are preventable. And, 13 percent of the 22 million unsafe abortions result in maternal deaths. To convey this and other health data, Doctors Without Borders created a robust, multimedia online project, Because Tomorrow Needs Herwhere health workers and patients alike share their life experiences either administering care in low-resource settings, or seeking quality care with the burden of heavy obstacles like transportation, costs, and proximity to a health facility.

Through eight interactive chapters with compelling first-person accounts Doctors Without Borders highlights important women’s health issues including maternal health, fistulas, unsafe abortions, and sexual violence among others.

“It is unconscionable that in many parts of the world today, women have no access to quality obstetric care, when providing it is not complicated,” said Séverine Caluwaerts, an MSF obstetrician/gynecologist. “High impact, yet low-cost interventions by trained health staff can have a dramatic impact on maternal mortality.”

Continue reading How Four Organizations Use Storytelling and Data to Highlight Women’s Health and Global Progress