Category Archives: Cervical Cancer

Cervical Cancer: Haitian Women’s Next Biggest Killer

By Dr. Leslee Jaeger

Mother and Child. HaitiRoseline had delivered her baby during the chaos of our first day at Mama Baby Haiti, a birthing center for women near CapHaitian, Haiti. Mondays are the busiest day at the center, located on a dirt road just off Highway 1, as it is the intake day for expectant mothers that are new to the program. Three of us had arrived the night before from the early spring of Minnesota weather to be greeted by unseasonable warm Haitian weather – 95 degrees and high humidity.

While we were teaching 10 Haitian nurses and physicians asked about cervical cancer screening in a low resource setting and Roseline was laboring with the aide of a Haitian trained nurse midwife to deliver her healthy baby girl. She graciously agreed to be interviewed only hours after the birth of her child and shortly before she was to depart for her home (patients stay at the center for only 4 hours after an uncomplicated birth).

As is true for many of the 30-40 women who deliver at Mama Baby Haiti each month, she had heard of the program through a friend. She lives 20 minutes away and had been seen for five prenatal visits. She was appreciative of the nurse midwives that seemed to listen to her concerns and the cleanliness of the birthing center. This was Roseline’s first child. The father of her baby was sick and unable to work and she supported herself with side jobs and help from her family. The cost of her care at the center was much reduced from what her care would have cost at the local hospital. Without the services of Mama Baby Haiti, she would have had to deliver at home, either by herself or with an unskilled birth attendant.

Continue reading Cervical Cancer: Haitian Women’s Next Biggest Killer

Botswana Receives First White Space Telemedicine Service to Reach Rural Populations

One of the beautiful aspects of Africa is its beautiful, wide expanses. All over the continent you will be awed by how far-reaching your eyes can see especially when traveling through its spectacular countryside. But as much as it is beautiful, the size of Africa also poses a significant problem because without modern infrastructure, including the Internet, and transport to major cities, those who live in the deepest, far-reaching rural areas are not privy to the best medical care they can receive.

In Botswana, this is about to change.

In partnership with the University of Pennsylvania, Microsoft, the University of Botswana, and other global partners, the Botswana-University Hub (BUP) has launched a new project, “Project Kgolagano,” to bring telemedicine to rural areas in the country to help diagnose maternal health cases as well as HIV, cervical cancer, and TB cases.

Using TV white spaces (unused broadcasting frequencies in the wireless spectrum) Internet broadband is able to reach even the most remote villages in developing countries. In fact, it has been reported that Microsoft and Google are both chasing white spaces in Africa where only 16 percent of the continent’s population is online. This is where solar power can be game-changing to keep Africa online despite its energy shortcomings. Just look at Kenya where Microsoft helped provide broadband Internet in rural areas even when electricity was nonexistent or very scarce.

Continue reading Botswana Receives First White Space Telemedicine Service to Reach Rural Populations

Focusing on Cervical Cancer on World Cancer Day

Today is World Cancer Day, a day to talk about and discuss cancer and the myths surrounding the global disease. On World Cancer Day we are focusing our efforts on cervical cancer and its effects on women in poor countries.

Last year I met a cervical cancer nurse, Susan Banda, at the N’Gombe Health Clinic in Lusaka, Zambia who said she is treating more and more women every day with cervical cancer. Africa has the highest rates of cervical cancer deaths at 270,000 each year. By 2030 it is estimated that 500,000 women will die from cervical cancer and 98% of those deaths will be in low and middle-income countries. Humanitarian organizations and governments are working to end the amount of cervical cancer deaths and diagnoses. USAID is working toward and funding a single-visit approach to cervical cancer (pdf). Jhpiego is studying the rate of cervical cancer in African women and has implemented programs in Africa since 1995 to fight the disease.

You might have also heard about the Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon initiative that was created by the George W. Bush Institute. Partnering with PEPFAR and Susan B. Komen among other implementing and founding partners, the Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon campaign will increase the number of HPV vaccines for girls and will help fund cervical cancer treatments.

This World Cancer Day think about the amount of women who are diagnosed with cervical cancer every day. You can help by donating to our partner Jhpiego. For $25 you can provide a cervical cancer screening unit with vinegar, lights, and swabs.

DONATE: www.jhpiego.org/donate

WATCH: See Susan Banda’s cervical screening room, her tools, and her thoughts on working with women who have cervical cancer.

Why African Women Are Dying of Cervical Cancer

With so many communicable diseases plaguing the African continent we often forget about the non-communicable diseases that ravish its people as well. Did you know that cervical cancer is the number one cancer killer of women in Africa? Taking the lives of roughly 270,000 African women each year, Jhpiego, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University, has been studying the rate of cervical cancer in women with HIV/AIDS. They found that women who are HIV positive are two to three times more likely to test positive for cervical cancer than women who are HIV negative. In fact, every two minutes an African woman dies of cervical cancer.

Women who are diagnosed and treated early have a greater chance of survival. However cervical cancer testing and prevention services are scarce. The good news is cervical cancer is preventable. Learn more about Jhpiego’s single visit screen-and-treat approach and help them save women from succumbing to cervical cancer at jhpiego.org.