Category Archives: maternal mortality

5 Maternal Health Interventions That Save Mothers’ Lives

Every day 800 women die during childbirth or from pregnancy complications. This startling statistic represents women who not only live in sub-Saharan Africa where most maternal deaths occur but also throughout the world.

In order to reduce the number of maternal deaths in low- and middle-income countries across the globe design teams, social entrepreneurs, innovators, and NGOs are creating innovative ways in which to save more mothers’ lives through inexpensive interventions that are conducive to low resource settings.

In many hospitals and health clinics, for example, power can go out at any moment requiring alternatives that allow health workers workarounds to the perpetual problem of power outages. In these settings, women can also experience life-threatening postpartum hemorrhage that requires immediate attention with interventions that stop bleeding. Additionally, some women do not have the money to afford the items needed during childbirth and innovators are solving those problems as well.

While maternal deaths have fallen 50 percent since 1990, in some countries the maternal mortality rate remains stagnant. Only half of expecting mothers in developing countries receive the health care they need to deliver healthy babies and to survive childbirth.

Below are five innovative interventions that are used in countries where maternal mortality is high in order to make a positive impact on saving mothers’ lives.

  • Jhpiego: (Updated, May 11, 2017) While Jhpiego developed a “testing pen” to catch and diagnose eclampsia in its earliest stages the project did not move forward after rigorous testing.

    Safe Surgeries: Jhpiego has partnered with the GE Foundation, funder for the Safe Surgery 2020 Initiative, to ensure mothers have access to safe, affordable, life-saving caesarean sections in Ethiopia. With the help and input of Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health, Safe Surgery 2020 provides training, leadership skills, and updated procedures for safe surgeries at partner institutions in Ethiopia through implementing partner Jhpiego. The results have seen improved patient care and recovery, fewer surgery backlogs, reduced infections, and a holistic approach to safer surgeries.

  • PATH: PATH created an antishock garment that controls postpartum bleeding by applying pressure to the lower body and forcing blood upwards and prevents hemorrhage. Postpartum hemorrhage is the number one cause of maternal deaths.
  • PATH: PATH also developed a balloon tamponade to stop uterine bleeding early. While there are other balloon tamponades in the market, they are expensive and inaccessible, especially in the developing world.
  • Ayzh: Ayzh produces kits with necessary materials for mothers and newborns living in poverty. These kits provide everything from medicine to clothes for the babies and make their lives that little bit easier.
  • WeCareSolar: WeCareSolar provides “solar suitcases” full of lights, mobile communication devices, and medical machinery. This allows those devices to operate in areas without access to electricity.

Art provided by uzuriart.com.

Will Trump’s Global Family Planning Cuts Cause Side Effects?

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Actress and U.N. Population Fund Goodwill Ambassador Ashley Judd visited a refugee camp in Mafraq, Jordan in 2016.
AP Photo/Raad Adayleh


Written by Rachel Sullivan Robinson
, American University School of International Service

President Donald Trump is leading an assault on family planning around the world.

Most recently, his administration cut off U.S. contributions to the United Nations Population Fund, which provides and funds reproductive health services in poor countries. That follows his reinstatement of what’s known as the “global gag rule,” the executive order enacted by all Republican presidents since Ronald Reagan barring foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that receive U.S. funding from even mentioning abortion.

But Trump wants to go even further than his GOP predecessors by slashing spending on global health efforts funded through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Deeper family planning retrenchment would, however, put millions of lives at risk.

Continue reading Will Trump’s Global Family Planning Cuts Cause Side Effects?

New Maternal Health Mobile App for Tanzanian Women Seeks Crowdfunding

The more technology improves in low-and-middle income countries the quicker mobile apps will be invented and scaled to better people’s live. We already know that banking apps have transformed the exchange of money and have helped economies like Kenya’s thrive. Now, innovators are looking to create more and more mobile apps to transform health care and save more lives.

Sub-Saharan Africa has some of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. While those numbers have fallen considerably over the past decade, the numbers still remain incredibly high. In Tanzania, for example, the maternal mortality rate is 578 per every 100,000 live births according to the World Health Organization.  Most of these deaths occur due to postpartum hemorrhage, complications during delivery and postpartum infections. When women deliver their babies at home or do not get proper prenatal care during pregnancy the probability that they might die increases.

Smart Access to Health for All (SAHFA), a nonprofit organization that specifically creates applications for rural communities to be able to access quality health information from their mobile phones, wants to save more lives through its technology. JamboMama! is its first project and is seeking 10,000 euros in crowdfunding to complete.

The JamboMama! app provides health information to expecting women and connects them to their health workers. It provides pregnancy updates and sends women’s medical records to the hospital where they will give birth. JamboMama! also sends text updates about the mother’s pregnancy and prompts her to answer questions about how she is feeling and how her pregnancy is moving along. For women in rural communities who cannot always get to their community health posts, health clinics, or hospitals JamboMama! can be the difference between life and death.

 

SAHFA plans to launch JamboMama! in Tanzania as its first pilot program. To donate to the creation of JamboMama! visit SAHFA’s crowdfunding page at https://www.helloasso.com/associations/sahfa/collectes/jambomama.

While the payment instructions are in French, you can allow Google to translate the page.

Photo: Jennifer James

Despite Differences in Culture, US and India Fall Short in Childbirth in Similar Ways

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Woman in labor, shown with monitors. 

Neel Shah, Harvard Medical School

After eight years of practicing obstetrics and researching childbirth in the United States, I know as well as anyone that the American maternal health system could be better. Our way of childbirth is the costliest in the world. Our health outcomes, from mortality rates to birth weights, are far, far from the best.

The reasons we fall short are not obvious. In medicine, providing more care is often mistaken for providing better care. In childbirth the relationship between more and better is complicated. Texan obstetricians, when compared to their counterparts in neighboring New Mexico, are 50% more likely to intervene on the baby’s behalf by performing a cesarean section. Nonetheless, Texas babies still have a lower survival rate than New Mexican babies.

I long assumed that our most puzzling American health care failures were idiosyncrasies–unique consequences of American culture, geography, and politics. But a trip to India for the 2017 Human Rights in Childbirth meeting led me to a humbling realization: when it comes to childbirth, both countries fall short in surprisingly similar ways.

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Neel Shah, center, pictured with Jishnu Das, a Lead Economist at the World Bank and Leslie Page, President of the Royal College of Midwives. Neel Shah, Author provided

Human rights in childbirth

I take care of patients in at a well-funded teaching hospital in Boston, where pregnant women seem well-respected and have clear, inviolable rights.

Continue reading Despite Differences in Culture, US and India Fall Short in Childbirth in Similar Ways