Category Archives: Non-Communicable Disease

Be a Hero and Send a Valentine’s Day

This Valentine’s Day, you can be a hero. Children’s Memorial Hospital in Chicago has put together an amazing campaign for kids that are at the hospital on Valentine’s Day. The campaign is inspired by a little girl who had leukemia.

Four years ago, a little girl names Taylor changed Valentine’s Day forever. Weak from Leukemia, she asked her grandmother a heart breaking question:

“Is there anything worse than leukemia?”

Her grandmother reached over and squeezed Taylor’s hand. “How about not feeling loved?”

Taylor wanted to do something special for all the kids who’d be spending Valentine’s Day at Children’s—to give them something to show them that they are loved. Tragically, Taylor lost her battle but her legacy lives on.

Help continue what Taylor started. Send your Valentine today, along with a donation to help kids fighting for their lives. Click here to send a Valentine’s Day card to a child and bring a smile to their face.

Send a Valentine’s Card.

Watch them smile on this video. It is incredible what a small gesture can do. Children belong on the playground and it is heartbreaking to see them fight for their lives at a hospital.

Children’s Memorial Hospital is a wonderful organization that puts kids first. They believe that Heroes are ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Heroes see a need and take action. Heroes put others first. Heroes want to make change for the better.

At Children’s Memorial Hospital, heroes come in all shapes and sizes!

Be a hero and send a Valentine’s Card.

Happy Valentine’s Day! 

70+ Bloggers Rally for American Heart Month

If you see a lot of red this month it’s not only because it’s the annual love month, but also because it is American Heart Month. Fact: heart disease is the number one killer of women*.

Over seventy bloggers have come together for The Heart Project, a collaborative effort to raise awareness and funds for the American Heart Society. Spearheaded by Jaime, creator of Hands On As We Grow, the bloggers have amassed their talents to create craft projects with a heart theme. All photos and craft ideas will then be included in an e-book that Jaime is selling for $5. All proceeds (not just profit) will be donated to the American Heart Society.

Additionally all of the bloggers are hosting giveaways every day (some multiple per day) of the craft projects to gain more awareness of the ebook and the American Heart Association. Melissa & Doug, CraftProjectIdeas.com and Fudoo Boards are all donating products or matching $1 per ebook sold up to $500.

To learn more, visit The Heart Project.

*Source: American Heart Association

New Partner Announcement – Shot at Life

Did you know 1.7 million children in developing nations will die this year because they don’t have access to life-saving vaccines? How can this be changed, you ask? Lives can be saved by simply administering vaccines to children who are most vulnerable to life-threatening diseases like malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, and polio. It’s that easy.

I am happy to announce that we have partnered with Shot at Life, a United Nations Foundation campaign that educates, connects and empowers Americans to champion vaccines as one of the most cost-effective ways to save the lives of children in developing countries. Read an interview with Peg Willingham, Shot at Life’s Executive Director.

A national call to action for this global cause, the campaign rallies the American public, members of Congress, and civil society partners around the fact that together, we can save a child’s life every 20 seconds by expanding access to vaccines. By encouraging Americans to learn about, advocate for, and donate vaccines, the United Nations Foundation’s Shot@Life campaign will decrease vaccine-preventable childhood deaths and give children a shot at a healthy life. To learn more, go to ShotatLife.org.

Like Shot at Life on Facebook and follow them on Twitter.

Interviewing Peg Willingham, Shot at Life’s Executive Director

Children in Kisumu, Kenya

In many developing nations children are born with a distinct disadvantage: the risk of dying from pneumonia or diarrhea, the two leading causes of death for children in the third world. If these children are fortunate enough to escape the grip of those two infectious diseases they may come down with malaria or measles, or be crippled by polio.

Young lives teeter between life and death every day in the poorest countries in the world. In fact, 1.7 million children will die this year because they have succumbed to one of the aforementioned diseases. With life-saving vaccines, however, the outcome for hundreds of thousands of poor children in developing nations can be changed. They will live.

The United Nation Foundation’s new program, Shot at Life*, works to combat the problem of children dying senselessly from diseases that can be thwarted through simple vaccines. With a generous donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and other partners such as UNICEF and GAVI Alliance, Shot at Life encourages Americans to champion vaccines as an effective, verified, and cost-effective way to save the lives of children in developing countries.

Peg Willingham, Executive Director, Shot at Life

Recently a team from Shot at Life including its Executive Director, Peg Willingham, as well as a team of congressional staffers traveled to Honduras to see the rate of childhood vaccinations and the outcomes from vaccinating 99 percent of its children.

“We selected Honduras because we wanted to show a success story to congressional staffers and the media,” said Willingham. “We wanted to show them here are the people you are helping.”

“Honduras was one of the earliest countries to receive the new vaccines for pneumonia and diarrhea,” said Willingham. Since then GAVI Alliance, the Pan American Health Organization, the Honduras government including health workers, teachers, and the police as well as community volunteers have worked in tandem to ensure the successful inoculation rate of its children. This levels the playing field for children who could die from preventable disease and drastically reduces child mortality.

Willingham also cited Mozambique, one of the poorest countries in the world, because of its willingness and desire to vaccinate its children to help severely reduce measles cases. Even though Mozambique only has one major highway that traverses its country and has recently emerged from a devastating civil war, the Mozambique government had the political will to vaccinate its children. “Over the course of five days 3.6 million children in Mozambique were vaccinated,” recalled Willingham who was in the southeastern African country during their massive vaccination campaign. Such a large undertaking took nine months to plan and its success relied on a top-down model of everyone working together from the government and its partners to the media to health workers, church groups and local volunteers. Due to the widespread and succinct nationwide messaging some mothers walked 15 miles in order to ensure their children were vaccinated.

Shot at Life is currently building a national network of supporters who believe every child deserves the right to life by receiving life-saving vaccines. Since its soft launch in September 2011 over 74,000 people have already joined in support. Shot at Life is now working to engage even more people through social media and mothers’ and parents’ groups around the country to spread the word about their global efforts to keep children alive.

On April 26 during National Immunization Week, Shot at Life will officially launch in Atlanta at the world-renowned Georgia Aquarium. In preparation for their launch Shot at Life has brought in a team of digital moms to their Washington, DC offices today for a summit to gear up for a nationwide roll-out of volunteers to spread the word about vaccine awareness.

To learn more about how you can help visit Shot at Life at www.shotatlife.org.

* Shot at Life is an official partner of Mom Bloggers for Social Good