Category Archives: philanthropy

[Reviews] 2 Social Good Books For Your Bookshelf

I recently received two books about philanthropy: Successful Philanthropy: How to Make a Life By What You Give (now in paperback) and The Rotary Book of Readings: Inspiration to Change the World both published by Hatherleigh Press. They are quick reads that promote inspiration and encouragement for those who give.

Successful PhilanthropySuccessful Philanthropy by Jean Shafiroff
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Starting the year off with the intention of increasing your giving is a noble resolution to home in on. If you don’t know where to start in your giving journey, Successful Philanthropy: How to Make a Life By What You Give is a decent place to start. An extremely quick read, Successful Philanthropy provides a broad look at philanthropy as a whole from adding donations and volunteering into your giving efforts to knowing what to expect when you join a nonprofit board.

Jean Shafiroff, a member of many philanthropic boards and a socialite in New York City, lays out the foundation of philanthropy in Successful Philanthropy now out in paperback. She begins by reiterating time and again that you don’t have to give large donations in order to become a philanthropist. In fact, anyone can be a philanthropist. It involves only three tenets: giving of monetary donations (no matter the amount), giving your time, and lending your expertise to people in need. Historically, we think of philanthropists like powerful people who are able to give their wealth away to charities for generation. Today, the definition of philanthropy has evolved. Philanthropy is available to everyone.

Shafiroff also talks about the importance of choosing the right charity for you. That entails doing your research and due diligence about the charities you want to work with, especially if you decide to give a large donation or dedicate entire swaths of time to volunteering for an organization. She provides the best websites to visit to look up the facts about nonprofits from their financials to whether they are even registered as a legitimate nonprofit.

For those who want to become a part of local charities in a big way by chairing galas, becoming a part of a board, and accepting awards for the work you do with nonprofits, Successful Philanthropy lays out what this all means. Shafiroff is known throughout New York City and the Hamptons about the amount of money she is able to raise for the charities she cares about like the New York City Mission Society and Southampton Hospital Association. She discusses how to network on behalf of the charities for other donations. She mentions that this also means knowing when to ask for donations and push for larger gifts to building relationships with people that may take years to cultivate in order to get a “yes” for donations. She also lets her readers know what it means to chair a gala. Hint: it’s not easy as well as what generational giving means.

The most important aspect of Successful Philanthropy is Shafiroff discusses how imperative it is to teach children about giving from a young age. It will give them greater meaning beyond their education, jobs, and relationships. It is the biggest lesson in the book by far.

If you are looking for a deep dive into philanthropy and giving, Successful Philanthropy may not be the book for you. But for those who are just starting out it will give inspiration about doing good in your life by simply giving.

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World Vision Now Puts Child Sponsorship Into the Rightful Hands of Children

World Vision USA has embarked on a new twist on child sponsorship that is absolutely delightful. Traditionally how child sponsorship works is sponsors pick photos of children who live in poverty and need assistance. But now children get to choose their sponsors giving them a sense of empowerment and becoming a full part of the process.

World Vision USA started their Chosen program in Kenya and documented it in the beautiful video below. In fact, you can be a part of Chosen by signing up to be a child sponsor (it starts at $39 per month) and then uploading your photo. You can also be chosen by a child. Then your monthly donation is put into community programs for children. Sign up by October 6.

I enjoy seeing World Vision’s work in the Philippines when I traveled with them in 2016 and also love the new innovative they are now working with children. In fact, they are in Ecuador with their Chosen program. It’s awesome to watch.

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International Day of Charity: 5 Ways To Improve Your Charity Online

September 5th is the International Day of Charity. Declared by the United Nations, this day coincides with the anniversary of the death of Mother Teresa. The idea is to promote goodwill all around the world. Here are 5 ways how the internet can boost your generosity.

1.Collect The Information Online: When starting a charity, you should have a clear mission and an accurate goal. It is vital to collect the right information so you could choose the best ways to contribute to the cause. Data will help you to plan your long-term actions. Furthermore, people will feel better when donating to a cause with a clear plan. 

Data can help you to understand your donors as well. Institute of Fundraising released a guide to data and fundraising. Guide states that increasing availability of data enables charities to understand their donors more than before. It also helps to build longer-lasting relationships. The revenue increases and it allows organizations to achieve their missions better.

2. Spread The News Online`: Once you have the information about the cause and the donors, it’s time to share the news about your charity. You should use the world wide web to make your cause visible online. You can start fundraising in a few steps with platforms for online donating, such as JustGiving

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The 3 stages of Giving: Deference, Arrogance and Inquiry

File 20180613 32304 1e39cxp.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
Great minds don’t always think alike.
Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

Jennifer A. Jones, University of Florida

If you had US$1 million to give to charities aiming to eradicate poverty, how would you do it?

Would you support a soup kitchen? A financial literacy program? Educational scholarships? Organizations pressing for policy changes?

I worked for nonprofits for many years before realizing the way I approached solving social problems said more about me than it did about the problem I wanted to solve. If I really wanted to make a difference, I had to think about how I was thinking about the problem. And, if I wanted to make a difference at a broader level, I had to help donors and nonprofit leaders think about how they think.

Nonprofit fundraisers consider many demographic characteristics to explain and predict charitable giving, such as age, gender, income, and marital and parental status. As far as I could tell, no scholars had considered “how people think” as a category worth considering.

My quest led me to obtain my Ph.D. and learn to analyze how an individual’s thinking changes over time. Along the way, I found that how people construct their ideas influences their philanthropic choices, and that how donors think is as important as what they think.

How donors think

Human beings develop increasingly complex ways of making sense of the world over the course of a lifetime. To a large extent, this is intuitive – you probably expect a 20-year-old to think about many things differently than a 50-year-old. How people think, however, is largely unconscious. People are rarely aware of how they are thinking in the moment.

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IKEA Foundation Grants $53 Million to Support Children’s Right to Play

War and conflict. Poverty. Gender discrimination. Growing up too fast. These are just some of the reasons children in some of the poorest countries around the world are not allowed to play. Play makes children healthier and more resilient. It heals some of their greatest wounds and helps them remain kids without growing up too soon. Additionally, play is every child’s fundamental right according to Article 31 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Unfortunately, millions of children around the world aren’t allowed to play.

IKEA is a global leader in the power of play not only in their stores but also in countries where children are routinely denied the right to play. That’s why the IKEA Foundation has granted $53 million to six leading global organizations that work with children and promote play including Handicap International, Save the Children, Special Olympics, Room to Read, UNICEF and War Child for its good cause campaign, Let’s Play for Change.

These six organizations will focus their efforts on helping children in Asia and Africa in countries such as Kenya, Bangladesh, Jordan, and Ethiopia. “Every child has the right to play. Stimulation through play is a critical part of a young child’s brain development and emotional well-being,” said Per Heggenes, CEO of the IKEA Foundation.

“Sadly, there are too many places around the world where devastating circumstances prevent children from simply being ‘kids’. Through the Let’s Play for Change campaign, we want to alleviate challenges to play and development in some of the world’s most vulnerable communities.”

Learn more at ikeafoundation.org.

One World Play Project

Haiti.Jacmel.GoalsBeyondtheNet-667x500Another business that promotes play is the One World Play Project, a mission-driven company based in Berkeley, CA that makes resilient toys designed for rough terrain—fields scattered with rocks, thorns, and broken glass—where most of the world plays.

When you buy a One World Futbol ($39.50-$44.50 depending on the color), One World Play Project gives a Futbol to a community in need. The One World Futbol never needs a pump and never goes flat. If you just want to give a Futbol, the price is $25.

After seeing impoverished communities around the world where kids have made balls out of anything they can find, I know how important a simple ball can be for kids and their overall mental and physical health.

Learn more at oneworldplayproject.com.