Category Archives: United States

Remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Today By Donating to His Historic Sites In Atlanta and Montgomery

A few years ago I traveled through Alabama on its Civil Rights trail with the Alabama Tourism Board. I am so glad I went on that trip. I learned so much about the Civil Rights movement that I didn’t know and visited poignant historic sites that really brought the movement to life.

Today on this Martin Luther King Jr. Day I want to share some of the places I visited and the ways you can give back to these historic sites so others can learn from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy.

The King Center (Atlanta, GA)

The King Center prepares global citizens to create a more just, humane and peaceful world using Dr. King’s nonviolent philosophy and methodology. Donate to The King Center.

Ebenezer Baptist Church (Atlanta, GA)

Martin Luther King Jr.’s funeral was held at Ebenezer Baptist Church, the church where his father preached as did he. He remained co-pastor until his death in 1968. The National Park Foundation restored the church and gives tours to those who want to see part of MLK’s early history. Donate to Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home (Atlanta, GA)

Martin Luther King and his siblings were all born in this home. After his death in 1968, this home was turned into a museum. It has been restored with original furniture as well as with toys and linens from the children. National Park Service rangers lead free tours of the home. Donate to the National Park Service.

Dexter Parsonage Museum (Montgomery, AL)

Martin Luther King and his family lived in the Dexter parsonage from 1954 – 1960 . Often bombed, the home still stands and was turned into a museum in 1982. Fortunately no one was hurt during the height of the Civil Rights movement in this home. You can donate to the tourism ministry in order for tours to continue.

The Best and Worst States to Have a Baby

Image by Uzuri Art.

I write about maternal health a lot on Social Good Moms and sometimes I don’t write enough about newborn health. I saw some interesting information this month about the best and worst states to have a baby and thought the data was interesting to share. The data was compiled by Wallet Hub.

They compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across four key dimensions:

  • Cost
  • Health Care
  • Baby-Friendliness and
  • Family-Friendliness

Additionally, across these four dimensions, they evaluated 30 additional metrics including infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate, Cesarean deliveries, preterm birth and low-birth weight infants.

The best and worst states are listed in the table below. One of the most important things for all parents to check for is their newborn health screenings. You can find yours based on your state at Baby’s First Test. And in North Carolina, mothers can sign up for an additional two free tests ( fragile X syndrome and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA))at EarlyCheck.org. The tests are led by RTI International.

BESTWORST
1 Vermont 42 West Virginia
2
Massachusetts
43
Florida
3 North Dakota 44 Nevada
4 Rhode Island 45 Arkansas
5 Minnesota 46
Georgia
6 New Hampshire 47 Oklahoma
7 Washington 48 Louisiana
8 Colorado 49
South Carolina
9 Connecticut 50 Alabama
10 Utah 51 Mississippi

Best vs. Worst

  • Mississippi has the lowest average annual cost for early child care, $3,192, which is 4.9 times lower than in the District of Columbia, the highest at $15,515.
     
  • Alaska has the lowest share of childbirths with low birth weight, 6.19 percent, which is 1.9 times lower than in Mississippi, the highest at 11.60 percent.
     
  • The District of Columbia has the most obstetricians and gynecologists (per 100,000 residents), 25, which is 25 times more than in Oklahoma, the fewest at 1.
     
  • Massachusetts has the highest parental leave policy score, 160, while 9 states, such as Alabama, Michigan and South Dakota, tie for the lowest at 0.

To learn about the data visit WalletHub.com.

11 Maternal Health Organizations to Support This Year

Maternal mortality continues to be a major problem the world over. The United States is the only developed country where maternal death rates are increasing especially for non-Hispanic black women. And in low-and-middle income countries, approximately 830 women die each day from pregnancy-related, preventable causes.

Maternal health organizations are working diligently to save more mothers’ lives, but one death is still too many especially when it is likely preventable. I like to list organizations that you can support with donations in order to help them keep more women and their children alive on the local level and make sure mothers are a part of their families’ lives.

This list highlights local organizations that help some of the most vulnerable communities in countries with some of the highest maternal mortality rates. And, in the cases of the United States and Australia, the organizations help the communities that experience the most maternal deaths. Each site allows direct donations that go directly to maternal care and/or advocacy.

Continue reading 11 Maternal Health Organizations to Support This Year

U.S. Support of Formula Over Breastfeeding is a Race Issue

File 20180723 189332 k5ycpp.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
The formula industry has responded to the decline in sales to white women at home by ramping up its marketing to Black and brown women overseas.
(Shutterstock)

Andrea Freeman, University of Hawaii

When the United States threatened Ecuador with trade and aid restrictions if it did not withdraw a World Health Assembly breastfeeding promotion resolution that most people considered benign, if not banal, reactions ranged from shocked to amused.

Experts explained that the U.S. resistance, although extreme, was nothing new. The United States previously demonstrated its allegiance to the formula industry by refusing to sign on to the World Health Organization’s Ban on the Marketing of Breast Milk Alternatives.

This U.S. stance, like its intimidation of Ecuador, flew in the face of near universally accepted medical and scientific research proving that breastfeeding saves lives. Perhaps even more surprisingly, both acts perpetuate an alarming racial divide in breastfeeding rates that leads to significant racial health disparities. American support of the formula industry comes at the cost of the health and lives of Black and brown babies, at home and abroad.

Both the resolution and the U.S. opposition to it stemmed from a decline in formula sales in the United States. The industry has sought to make up for its considerable domestic losses on the global market. The racial aspects of this local-global dynamic are hidden in plain sight.

Continue reading U.S. Support of Formula Over Breastfeeding is a Race Issue

Duracell Distributes $1 Million of Batteries in Puerto Rico for Hurricane Relief

Duracell Announcement
Duracell PowerForward vehicles wait to be loaded onto a cargo plane on its way to Puerto Rico to distribute more than $1 million worth of batteries for disaster relief, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017 in Portsmouth, N.H. (Winslow Townson/AP Images for Duracell)

With nearly 84% of Puerto Rico still without power after Hurricane Maria, Duracell has arrived on the island today and will distribute $1 million of batteries as well as charging mobile devices and internet access through its Power Forward initiative. When natural disasters occur Duracell helps to reconnect communities. Puerto Rico will be its largest distribution effort since it launched in 2011.

PowerForward will charge mobile devices, radios, and flashlights, and provide power for critical medical devices like dialysis machines, hearing aids and ventilators. Duracell is working with the Red Cross to assess areas where there is the most need.

Duracell Announcement
A Duracell PowerForward vehicle is loaded onto a cargo plane on its way to Puerto Rico to distribute more than $1 million worth of batteries for disaster relief, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017 in Portsmouth, N.H. (Winslow Townson/AP Images for Duracell)

Duracell will update its Twitter and Facebook accounts with the next truck location as it navigates the island.

We have personally seen phenomenal post-recovery efforts in both Nepal after the earthquake and the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan. We’re hoping to help now when people have the most on-going need during the most harrowing times.

In order to help when disaster strikes, we need the government, NGOs, and the private sector to help as much as possible. For Puerto Rico, it seems they may have to rely on NGOs and the private sector more than they expected.

Duracell Announcement
A Duracell PowerForward vehicle is loaded onto a cargo plane on its way to Puerto Rico to distribute more than $1 million worth of batteries for disaster relief, Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017 in Portsmouth, N.H. (Winslow Townson/AP Images for Duracell)

If you have friends and family in Puerto Rico, please let them know to check the Duracell social accounts for location information.

This is not a compensated post.