Category Archives: United States

CDC Launches Campaign To Raise Awareness About Pregnancy and Postpartum Warning Signs

The other day I wrote about a Youtube mom who recently gave birth to her son and then recognized that her blood pressure was too high after she was released from the hospital. She immediately visited her OBGYN and then ultimately was hospitalized due to the severity of her condition, preeclampsia. You can follow her journey at R & L Life. She, her husband, and sister have updated viewers about how she is doing. Watching her videos shows how difficult it is for her doctors to get her blood pressure down after several days. It is all to show that warning signs during and after pregnancy are important to listen to and act upon as she did.

Continue reading CDC Launches Campaign To Raise Awareness About Pregnancy and Postpartum Warning Signs

[VIDEO] Mother Advocates for Her Own Health After Delivery And Preeclampsia #BlackMaternalHealth

A few years ago I was honored to speak at Blogher with Merck for Mothers. The panel was about maternal health outcomes globally as well as in the United States. As I have mentioned so many times on this blog, the United States leads the developing world with maternal health deaths. This number is exaccerbated by the sheer number of black women who die from pregnancy and delivery complications.

One of the key points we honed in on during the panel was the importance of women being advocates for themselves with their healthcare providers when they feel something is wrong. But, that is not always easy. Take Serena Williams for example. She basically had to beg doctors and nurses to get a CT scan to see if her lung had blood clots which she routinely got as an athlete. They finally relented and what did they find? Blood clots in her lungs. Serena saved her own life.

Many women, especially black women, are not afforded the opportunity to simply get a doctor or nurse to believe that they do not feel well and oftentimes their lives are hanging in the balance. In fact, NPR and ProPublica gathered over 200 stories from black women who felt that they had been “devalued and disrespected by medical providers” during their pregnancies.

I regularly watch a Youtube channel called R&L Life, a cute family channel out of Florida. The mother, Rachael, recently delivered her son and a few days later she had preeclampsia symptoms with massive swelling and high blood pressure. She and her husband went to her doctor only to discover she could have a seizure at any time because of her high blood pressure. She needed to be rushed to the hospital for oral medication and a magnesium drip.

Continue reading [VIDEO] Mother Advocates for Her Own Health After Delivery And Preeclampsia #BlackMaternalHealth

Remember Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Today By Donating to His Historic Sites In Atlanta and Montgomery

A few years ago I traveled through Alabama on its Civil Rights trail with the Alabama Tourism Board. I am so glad I went on that trip. I learned so much about the Civil Rights movement that I didn’t know and visited poignant historic sites that really brought the movement to life.

Today on this Martin Luther King Jr. Day I want to share some of the places I visited and the ways you can give back to these historic sites so others can learn from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy.

The King Center (Atlanta, GA)

The King Center prepares global citizens to create a more just, humane and peaceful world using Dr. King’s nonviolent philosophy and methodology. Donate to The King Center.

Ebenezer Baptist Church (Atlanta, GA)

Martin Luther King Jr.’s funeral was held at Ebenezer Baptist Church, the church where his father preached as did he. He remained co-pastor until his death in 1968. The National Park Foundation restored the church and gives tours to those who want to see part of MLK’s early history. Donate to Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Martin Luther King Jr. Birth Home (Atlanta, GA)

Martin Luther King and his siblings were all born in this home. After his death in 1968, this home was turned into a museum. It has been restored with original furniture as well as with toys and linens from the children. National Park Service rangers lead free tours of the home. Donate to the National Park Service.

Dexter Parsonage Museum (Montgomery, AL)

Martin Luther King and his family lived in the Dexter parsonage from 1954 – 1960 . Often bombed, the home still stands and was turned into a museum in 1982. Fortunately no one was hurt during the height of the Civil Rights movement in this home. You can donate to the tourism ministry in order for tours to continue.

The Best and Worst States to Have a Baby

Image by Uzuri Art.

I write about maternal health a lot on Social Good Moms and sometimes I don’t write enough about newborn health. I saw some interesting information this month about the best and worst states to have a baby and thought the data was interesting to share. The data was compiled by Wallet Hub.

They compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across four key dimensions:

  • Cost
  • Health Care
  • Baby-Friendliness and
  • Family-Friendliness

Additionally, across these four dimensions, they evaluated 30 additional metrics including infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate, Cesarean deliveries, preterm birth and low-birth weight infants.

The best and worst states are listed in the table below. One of the most important things for all parents to check for is their newborn health screenings. You can find yours based on your state at Baby’s First Test. And in North Carolina, mothers can sign up for an additional two free tests ( fragile X syndrome and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA))at EarlyCheck.org. The tests are led by RTI International.

BESTWORST
1 Vermont 42 West Virginia
2
Massachusetts
43
Florida
3 North Dakota 44 Nevada
4 Rhode Island 45 Arkansas
5 Minnesota 46
Georgia
6 New Hampshire 47 Oklahoma
7 Washington 48 Louisiana
8 Colorado 49
South Carolina
9 Connecticut 50 Alabama
10 Utah 51 Mississippi

Best vs. Worst

  • Mississippi has the lowest average annual cost for early child care, $3,192, which is 4.9 times lower than in the District of Columbia, the highest at $15,515.
     
  • Alaska has the lowest share of childbirths with low birth weight, 6.19 percent, which is 1.9 times lower than in Mississippi, the highest at 11.60 percent.
     
  • The District of Columbia has the most obstetricians and gynecologists (per 100,000 residents), 25, which is 25 times more than in Oklahoma, the fewest at 1.
     
  • Massachusetts has the highest parental leave policy score, 160, while 9 states, such as Alabama, Michigan and South Dakota, tie for the lowest at 0.

To learn about the data visit WalletHub.com.

11 Maternal Health Organizations to Support This Year

Maternal mortality continues to be a major problem the world over. The United States is the only developed country where maternal death rates are increasing especially for non-Hispanic black women. And in low-and-middle income countries, approximately 830 women die each day from pregnancy-related, preventable causes.

Maternal health organizations are working diligently to save more mothers’ lives, but one death is still too many especially when it is likely preventable. I like to list organizations that you can support with donations in order to help them keep more women and their children alive on the local level and make sure mothers are a part of their families’ lives.

This list highlights local organizations that help some of the most vulnerable communities in countries with some of the highest maternal mortality rates. And, in the cases of the United States and Australia, the organizations help the communities that experience the most maternal deaths. Each site allows direct donations that go directly to maternal care and/or advocacy.

Continue reading 11 Maternal Health Organizations to Support This Year