Tag Archives: Maternal death

Video: The Global Gag Rule Explained

More than likely you have heard about the Global Gag Rule also known as the Mexico City Policy this week. You can learn more about it in a previous post: Why the Global Gag Rule Will Increase Maternal Mortality.

To get right to the point, however, Planned Parenthood released this video: What is the Global Gag Rule that explains it succinctly.

Inside Sierra Leone’s Maternal and Newborn Mortality Rates

With an overall population of 5.9 million people in Sierra Leone, 200 women will die today from complications during childbirth. Every year, 2400 women lose their lives due to pregnancy related causes in Sierra Leone. And, close to 10,000 babies die every year during their first month of life. There has been notable progress in Sierra Leone to end maternal and newborn deaths in the small, coastal country, but the mortality rates are not decreasing fast enough.

Based on this year’s data from Save the Children’s State of the World’s Mothers Report , Sierra Leone was ranked as one of the worst places to be a mother for the past eight years. Ranked at #172, only Central African Republic, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Niger, DRC and Somalia are worse. And, according to this year’s State of the World’s Midwifery Report only 24% of all pregnancy needs are met by midwives in Sierra Leone.

Mamaye Sierra Leone is calling on its government to commit more resources to save the lives of women and their newborns. The Free Health Care Initiative has allowed countless women to deliver their babies in clinics, but unfortunately, these clinics are often void of the basic necessities for a safe delivery. In fact, over half of the clinics in Sierra Leone are not equipped to provide proper, quality maternal and newborn health care. One in six facilities in Sierra Leone are able to perform signal functions such as administering life-saving drugs, performing caesarean sections, newborn resuscitation, or blood transfusion, according to Mamaye.

What Does Sierra Leone Need to Save More Mothers and Babies?

  • Mamaye Sierra Leone says that the government needs to allocate more funds to emergency obstetrics and newborn care nationwide.
  • Mamaye Sierra Leone also says there needs to be a rapid scale-up of health workers who can provide safe delivery services to women across Sierra Leone.
  • And, thirdly, Mamaye Sierra Leone says there needs to be quality care across all health services.

Read more at www.mamaye.org.sl.

[Photos] Motherhood in Tanzania #IRPTZ

Dar es Saalam, Tanzania – Throughout my travels in Tanzania for the past ten days every time I saw a mother and her baby I smiled inside. And I was even more happy to see mothers breastfeeding their babies as breastfeeding has been proven to be a key intervention to keep more children under the age of five alive in developing countries.

Maasai Mother - Mkuru

Tanzania, unfortunately, is one of ten countries where 65 percent of the world’s child deaths occur. Compared to India, the country with the most child deaths at nearly 900,000 per year, Tanzania’s child mortality rate is low, but for it’s population size, the percentage is quite high.

Mother and Daughter in Morogoro, Tanzania

Tanzanian mothers lose 48,000 children a year (17,000 on the first day of life). Most newborns die due to asphyxia, infections, and preterm birth here. Additionally, the maternal mortality rate in Tanzania strongly correlates to the child mortality rate. In Tanzania, maternal anemia rates due to malnutrition are leading to 20 percent of all maternal deaths. And in the rural areas, where most Tanzanians live, expectant mothers typically do not have a trained birth attendant to help deliver babies and only 50 percent of Tanzanian mothers give birth in a health facility. These factors contribute to the high maternal and newborn mortality rate. In fact, Tanzania loses 454 mothers per 100,000 live births due to complications during childbirth.

Mother and Daughter in Morogoro, Tanzania

There is good news, however. The Tanzanian government is including key interventions to reduce child mortality included in its National Road Map Strategic Plan to Accelerate Reductions of Maternal, Newborn and Child Births which was devised in 2008 and has an end date of 2015 to reach Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. While the child mortality rate in
Tanzania is improving, maternal mortality rates have remained stagnant.

Mothers, Iringa

Mother and Daughter in Morogoro, Tanzania

Mother and Son in Iringa, Tanzania

Sources

UNICEF
Save the Children

Reporting was made possible by a fellowship from the International Reporting Project.

All photos copyright of Jennifer James

Save the Children Releases Report on Post-2015 Framework for Ending Poverty

Ending Poverty in Our GenerationAs we all know the Millennium Development Goals are set to expire in 2015. While much progress has been made globally over the past twenty years to eradicate poverty and to meet each of the individual goals there is still much to do. With the MDGs on their way out, Save the Children has devised a framework for post-2015 work to end global poverty and spur human development.

Save the Children’s Chief Executive Justin Forsyth said:

“An historic achievement is within reach. By committing to these ambitious but achievable new targets, we really can become the generation that ends extreme poverty forever.

“For the first time, it is feasible to imagine that in the next two decades no child will die from preventable causes, no child will go to bed hungry and every child will go to school.”

In Ending Poverty In Our Generation,  Save the Children says global poverty can end in 20 years through new goals it lays out for post-2015 global development action. Save the Children notes that the following goals are not meant to be definitive. Rather, they are a starting place to continue the poverty eradication conversation. A high level panel, including Prime Minister David Cameron, Liberian president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and Indonesia’s President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono will meet in Monrovia, Liberia between 29th January and 1st February 2013 to discuss the direction of post-2015 global development.

Goal 1: By 2030 we will eradicate extreme poverty and reduce relative poverty through
inclusive growth and decent work

Goal 2: By 2030 we will eradicate hunger, halve stunting, and ensure universal access to
sustainable food, water and sanitation

Goal 3: By 2030 we will end preventable child and maternal mortality and provide
healthcare for all

Goal 4: By 2030 we will ensure all children receive a good-quality education and have
good learning outcomes

Goal 5: By 2030 we will ensure all children live a life free from all forms of violence,
are protected in conflict and thrive in a safe family environment

Goal 6: By 2030 governance will be more open, accountable and inclusive

Goal 7: By 2030 we will have robust global partnerships for more and effective use of
financial resources

Goal 8: By 2030 we will build disaster-resilient societies

Goal 9: By 2030 we will have a sustainable, healthy and resilient environment for all

Goal 10: By 2030 we will deliver sustainable energy to all

UNICEF, one of Save the Children’s key partners, said they welcome the new goals and framework set forth in the report saying:

“UNICEF looks forward to continuing to work closely with Save the Children and other key partners for children’s rights, as the debate intensifies on how best to safeguard, extend and sustain human progress in the post-2015 international framework.”

Download Ending Poverty in Our Generation: Save the Children’s Vision for a Post-2015 Framework.

Photo: Children in Hawassa, Ethiopia. Copyright: Jennifer James