Tag Archives: Reproductive Health

Our Newest Partner: Marie Stopes

We are happy to announce that we have partnered with Marie Stopes, one of the leading global organizations that works for reproductive healthcare for all.

Marie Stopes International (MSI) is an international non-profit organization that provides quality family planning and reproductive healthcare to the poorest and most vulnerable individuals across 42 countries. Their mission is to provide individuals with a choice: the choice of when and whether to have children, the choice of what type of family planning methods to use, and the choice of where and how to access these services.

We look forward to working with their US team to advocate for reproductive healthcare for some of the world’s most marginalized women and men.

Follow Marie Stopes International on Facebook page and on Twitter at @mariastopes.

Photo: Marie Stopes

Key Tweets from Investing in Women’s Reproductive Health Session #WD2013

(Above) Musimbi Kanyoro, President and CEO , Global Fund for Women

Key Tweets from Investing in Women’s Reproductive Health Session

On the first day of the Women Deliver 2013 conference, here are key tweets we read during the plenary session: Investing in Women’s Reproductive Health Equals Investing in Economic and Social Progress for Everyone

  1. UN Women’s Puri: political empowerment leads to better health outcomes. Rwanda has 56 pct female parliamentarians. Has met MDGs. #WD2013
  2. Countries with higher female participation and education have better health outcomes #WD2013 @WomenDeliver
  3. “@UNFPA: “Gender equality and reproductive health are inextricably linked.” Jeni Klugman, @WorldBank #WDLive #WD2013“<<is true!
  4. Actual progress has been way to slow! says Jeni Klugman on gender equality and women’s health worldwide. #WD2013 #WDLive
  5. Change comes when scale and consistency are applied. Musimbi Kanyoro, President Global Fund for Women. #wd2013
  6. “Globally more than 1 in 3 girls are married before their 18th birthday” Jeni Klugman, @WorldBank #WD2013
  7. Every where we can find coca cola, why not family planning 🙂 @WomenDeliver #WD2013
  8. “Change comes when excellent programs are taken to scale to truly benefit communities.” @MKanyoro @GlobalFundWomen #WDLive #WD2013
  9. To ensure health and rights of #womenandgirls — ensure “all systems go”! -Lakshmi Puri @UNWomen #WDlive #WD2013 #gender
  10. Kanyoro: the first step us to affirm the human rights of women and girls as the other half of humanity #WD2013
  11. “We must provide the highest standards of health including sexual & #reprohealth for women & girls.” Lakshmi Puri @UNWomen #WDLive #WD2013

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Give to Maternal Health Programs in Uganda

Our partner, Shanti Uganda, is helping women experience safe deliveries in a country where 310 women out of 100,000 live births die during childbirth.

Now that a new year has rolled around Shanti Uganda has embarked on new opportunities to give and help women have healthy babies and safe, clean births. You can donate to provide more solar power for their birth house, purchase an acre of land to expand their services, provide birth supplies and transport, as well as contribute to their Vancouver office.

Read more about how to donate and support Shanti Uganda.

The White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood

White Ribbon Alliance for Safe MotherhoodThe White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood is an international coalition working to stop deaths during childbirth. They work in a number of countries including Uganda where they are looking to improve the national statistic of 1 in 49 chance of women dying during childbirth.

You can provide monthly or single donations to help keep women alive giving birth.

Life for Mothers

Life for MothersLife for Mothers seeks to identify, address, and prevent complications that arise during pregnancy, labor, delivery, and postpartum, ultimately decreasing maternal and infant mortality rates, according to the Life for Mothers web site.

The mission of Life for Mothers is to reduce maternal and infant mortality rates in developing countries, particularly those in Sub-Saharan Africa, by strengthening healthcare systems and developing, implementing, managing and funding integrated packages of essential services for maternal, newborn and child health at the district level.

You can donate via their Get Involved page.

[Watch] No Joke. #ChoiceMatters. Everywhere

Women around the world, especially in developing countries, often have difficulties accessing quality reproductive health care. For more than 55 years, Pathfinder International has worked to expand access to quality sexual and reproductive health care to enable and empower individuals to make choices about their body and their future.

To bring home the realities that women around the world face to access reproductive health care, Pathfinder created the No Joke. #ChoiceMatters. Everywhere video.  Watch this video and see why, although funny, the subject matter really is no joke at all.

Why One Woman Traveled from Algeria to Niger for Fistula Surgery

We are happy to publish the latest news from our partner Worldwide Fistula Fund. They do amazing work for women with obstetric fistulas. Please make a donation to help them continue the work they do.


From the Worldwide Fistula Fund:

Summer has been busy at the Danja Fistula Center. In July, a team of six people flew to Niger to assist the staff with patient care at the hospital. Over the course of the month, 40 surgeries were performed on women suffering from obstetric fistula. These women came to Danja hopeful that our team of medical experts would have the ability to repair their fistula and help them begin a new chapter to their life. Nearly everyone has returned to their village optimistic about the opportunities that lie ahead. One of those women is Habibati. We wanted to share her story with you.

Habibati immediately stood out to us as she did not look like most of our patients. Her skin was much fairer and softer and her hair was longer and braided. Unlike many of the women who traveled from nearby villages and spoke Hausa, Habibati is Algerian.

Habibati had a pre-arranged marriage at 13 and became pregnant at 14. For three days she labored in her village. Eventually the baby passed and was stillborn. Immediately she started leaking urine and her parents arranged for her to have surgery in Algeria. She had three surgeries there and none were successful. While in Algeria, she heard a news report from a North Africa BBC affiliate about a new fistula hospital in Niger and traveled to Danja in hopes of receiving another surgery.

Habibati’s relationship with her husband is unlike that of many of the patients who come through our door. Her husband came to Danja with her and stayed at a place close to the hospital so he could visit her daily. While so many women with fistula are abandoned by their husbands, it was heart-warming to see Habibati’s husband treat her with such care.

Communicating with Habibati required an extensive game of medical telephone and we were fortunate she also arrived with a friend who served as a personal translator. Our doctor spoke in English to our translator, who spoke in Hausa to one of our nurse’s aides. The nurse’s aide translated Hausa to Fulani to Habibati’s friend, and Habibati’s friend translated Fulani into Arabic for Habibati. Each response was translated back, from Arabic to Fulani to Hausa and then English. While time-consuming, the system worked and we were able to communicate with Habibati and prepare her for surgery.

It took Habibati some time to warm up to the surroundings in Danja because of the language barrier, but once the nurses learned to say hello in Arabic she quickly perked up. She received surgery and is recovering in the patient village. We all hope that this fourth surgery will be her last.

Please stay tuned to our blog for more news out of Danja, stories of the women we’ve served and updates on our progress.

To continue supporting the Danja Fistula Center — and help bring healing and medical care to thousands of women living with the agony of obstetric fistula — please make a tax-deductible one-time or recurring gift today. We thank you for your incredible generosity.

Photos: Worldwide Fistula Fund